2002 Inductee - Domingo Reyes


2002 Inductee - Domingo Reyes

Domingo Reyes We all want to be remembered after we die. Domingo is remembered by many people, for many reasons. He is remembered for his work in the Catholic Church and the farm labor movement. He is remembered for being a political activist and an exceptional singer. He is remembered for working 30 years at Tracy Defense Depot and volunteering for nearly 10 years at CYA (California Youth Authority). Domingo was a deacon at St. Linus Church from 1990 until his death on Cinco de Mayo, 2000. He assisted the priests with baptisms, marriages, Bible study classes, funerals and masses. At St. Gertrude’s he taught catechism classes. He also lectured, sang in the choir and was a member of Guadalupanos, a service organization. Raising money is difficult for any organization, so he helped do that. For several years he was the bazaar chairman and worked at all the bazaars held in Southside Stockton. Domingo grew up in a family of migrant workers that harvested crops in seven western states. As an adult he marched for the Farm Labor Union for over five years and worked in the fields on weekends and holidays. Politics was important for Domingo. He supported several candidates by raising funds for them and walking the precincts. He was president of Comite Patriotico for 5 2/3 years. He was also part of the Lyons Club, H.E.P.A., and the Knights of Columbus. He became the only non-G.I. to become an officer of the G.I. Forum when he became their state chaplain for almost three years. His top achievement might be bringing one state convention to Stockton. He was the Crusillo Movement president for seven years and served as rector for five years. Fund raising was one of his highest priorities. He also helped run the Crusillo retreats and often served as musical director. He was part of the Recollection Movement for five years. Recollection’s purpose is to “help teens stay on the right track and learn how to deal with peer pressure and learn that they had community and church support.” Domingo taught catechism and Bible study and counseled at CYA for nine years. He also volunteered at the women’s prison in Stockton. Becoming a deacon might have brought Domingo the most satisfaction. “He encountered even more people to help. He loved to help people and to sing. He sang with a big heart and generosity accompanied by compadres, friends and local mariachi groups and bands,” remembers Richard Rios. Domingo could have chosen to become a professional recording artist. “He turned it down because it meant that he would have to uproot his family,” Richard Rios remembers. Domingo accomplished so much because, “he saw a ‘brother or sister’ in every person he met, and loved the opportunity of trying to make this world we live in a better place in which to live,” explains Richard Rios.